Global Partnerships & Diplomacy

dip Pediatric Clinic

Introduction

The Global Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Partnership is a multi-stakeholder “mutual accountability” mechanism that will catalyze work across governmental and non-governmental boundaries at a country and global level through commitment-based initiatives, a robust open-source data platform, citizen accountability, and an independent peer review system.

Overview

The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) process presents a unique opportunity to ratify the success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and to outline a bold post-2015 framework. Yet, it is critical that the formation and implementation strategy of the SDGs expand beyond traditional development institutions and north-south, donor-recipient paradigms. To ensure the SDGs can achieve transformative results, a multi-stakeholder "mutual accountability" mechanism should be launched that will catalyze work across governmental and non-governmental boundaries at a country and global level through commitment-based initiatives, a robust open-source data platform, citizen accountability, and an independent peer review system.

Despite a still-struggling global economy, one where contagion from the developed world is now enveloping emerging economies, there is a boom in international donor-recipient diplomacy. Globalization forces us to recognize there is no longer easily divisible rich and poor, North and South, but a new universality, multi-layered, with complex cross-linkages.

Three distinct processes are in play.

The first, the Post-2015 Development Agenda, is about defining the next generation of goals to replace today’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The second, running on a parallel track, concerns the development of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), a process agreed at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, better known as Rio+20, in June this year.

The third, the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation, is a potentially key addition to the global development governance architecture.  This should provide new, more inclusive leadership on development cooperation in fora such as the UN and the G20.  It logically will displace rules framed by the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC), the club of Western donors and is very much a work-in-progress, agreed at the 2011 High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Busan. Going beyond the traditional framework, the Partnership would include old and new donors and the full spectrum of aid recipients (from those recently ‘graduated’ to those still heavily aid-dependent).  In the spirit of Busan it would also engage other development actors, notably civil society organisations (CSOs) and the private sector.