Int'l Peace and Security

Pediatric Clinic peace

Introduction

Contemporary approaches for tackling international peace and security issues require not only a coherent global approach, but also mutually reinforcing responses involving an effective United Nations system in tandem with strong regional organizations. The multidimensionality of the drivers of the conflicts also implies that addressing them requires a multidimensional approach that spans the development, political, security and justice areas.

Overview

Although many believe that war is inevitable, there are steps that nations can take to foster peace and security around the world and to eliminate the possibility of war. We conduct proactive evidence base research, advocate and blog on solutions around peacekeeping, genocide prevention, the "Responsibility to Protect", civilian protection, arms control, and current conflicts and hot spots around the globe.

How can you have development without peace, when in many countries, “people are worried about the safety of their life and limb, of their property,” asks Nikhil Seth, former head of the Secretariat for the intergovernmental negotiations that created the United Nations’ goals for achieving sustainable development around the world.

Wars and societal conflicts do not end with political statements. The mankind is fraught with painful experiences of the unwanted Two World Wars. The perpetrators escape the consequences pushing humanity into unthinkable disasters generations after generations. A war of words and conveniently arrived erotic hypothesis of the few sadistic warlords on complex global issues are draining out the positive energies, time and opportunities for peaceful dialogue towards conflict prevention and conflict management.

Changing nature of violent conflicts

The nature of violent conflicts has changed dramatically in recent decades. The predominant form of violent conflict has evolved from national armies fighting each other (inter-state wars); to armies fighting for independence, separation or political control (intra-state or civil wars); to various forms of violence, involving non-state actors such as rebels, gangs and organized crime. Unlike the Cold War current forms of violence often have no clear military, political or ideological objective.

 

These kinds of conflicts are not easily addressed with traditional instruments, such as diplomacy or military means. The drivers of violence often include a wide range of factors, including political, economic, social and environmental issues. They can include socioeconomic inequalities, injustice, joblessness, natural resources management, human rights abuse, political exclusion and corruption. In many cases, it is difficult to define clear causes and the roles of different factors are interrelated and might morph into each other and change over time.

 

The multidimensionality of the drivers of the conflicts also implies that addressing them requires a multidimensional approach that spans the development, political, security and justice areas. The different dimensions are interdependent. You cannot solve one without solving the other. Or in the words of the World Bank’s World Development Report on Conflict, Security, and Development: “military-only, justice-only or development-only solutions will falter”.